Hiking @ Mount Rinjani, Lombok, Indonesia

Brief Information

Mt Rinjani (Gunung Rinjani) is the second highest volcano in Indonesia with a peak of 3726m above sea level. This once massive volcano had since collapsed following a major eruption, forming an enormous caldera which is currently filled with a beautiful caldera lake (Segara Anak) and a new active volcano (Gunung Baru) sitting at 2000m above sea level.

My Experience

Mt Rinjani would be my second mountain climbing experience so far after Mt Kinabalu back in 2009. Anyone who had climbed Mt Kinabalu would know that Rinjani is 369m lower hence it should have been relatively easier. Again, coming from an averagely fit individual, both have their challenges. Although I think I may have some issues preparing for such hikes in the past because weeks before both occasions I never really bothered to train and build up my fitness level for some strange reason which I still cannot figure out. Coming back here, the difference in challenge was more of environmental during our ascent to the summit more than anything else which I will describe below.

We began our hike from Rinjani Information Post at Sembalun. There were a total of 3 rest posts, followed by ‘7 hills’ (according to our guide) on the way to base camp and this made up Day 1 of the climb. The hike to Post 1 was 2.5 hours, followed by an hour each to Post 2 and 3, and 3.5 hours to base camp. If you book your trip through a company, they will assign 1 porter per person and a guide depending on group size.

Day 1, 9.00am – The journey begins with a picturesque view of paddy fields against the prominent Mt Rinjani

Day 1, 9.00am – The journey begins with a picturesque view of paddy fields against the prominent Mt Rinjani

Rinjani Expedition Team for the trip and our guide standing rightmost

Rinjani Expedition Team for the trip and our guide standing rightmost

10.30am – The first section is mainly a stroll through grasslands with a short stretch of foliage cover. Beware of cow dung, they’re everywhere!

10.30am – The first section is mainly a stroll through grasslands with a short stretch of foliage cover. Beware of cow dung, they’re everywhere!

11.30pm – Lunch is served at Post 2. Over here you get a 1.5 hours break and you could also see your porters at work

11.30pm – Lunch is served at Post 2. Over here you get a 1.5 hours break and you could also see your porters at work

1.10pm – This is where you say “I’ve touched the clouds!”

1.10pm – This is where you say “I’ve touched the clouds!”

2.00pm – Post 3. The road below is actually made up of small black stones carried from the volcano during rainy season

2.00pm – Post 3. The road below is actually made up of small black stones carried from the volcano during rainy season

4.00pm – The going gets tough. Inclined slope for most of the way from Post 3.

4.00pm – The going gets tough. Inclined slope for most of the way from Post 3.

5.20pm – View at basecamp. Enjoy the sunset colours as it descends behind the mountain

5.20pm – View at basecamp. Enjoy the sunset colours as it descends behind the mountain

We settled in for the night at around 7pm, it was really cold as the temperature was approximately 5 degrees Celsius. But that didn’t stop me from doing some star gazing which was perfect: pitch black, halfway up the mountain, unobstructed view, and no mosquitoes, you have to see it for yourself.

Day 2, 1am, waking up to a hot cup of cocoa never felt so good. As we had our breakfast and made preparations for the final summit, I still wasn’t sure what to expect, all I knew was that the path is slippery at certain stretches of the hike and the fact that we had to depart earlier at 2am because our fitness levels meant we needed more time to reach the summit. I didn’t take any photos on the way up because it was simply too dark and that it would also be spoiling the surprise for future climbers.

Here’s where the difference lies ascending to the summit between Mt Rinjani and Mt Kinabalu. Composition of both mountains are obviously different as one is volcanic and the other a forested mountain. But in terms of challenges, I have to go with the former being more challenging. On Mt Kinabalu, you are hiking on flat rocky surface so as long as your shoes are in good shape and you don’t have altitude sickness, you shouldn’t face many difficulties. On the other hand at Mt Rinjani, majority of the time you’d be walking on surface made up of sand, dust and small stones. This was why the guides warned us that our hike to the peak is “2 steps forward, 1 step back” and it was literally what he said. Top that up with breathing volcanic dust kicked up by other hikers and unforgiving chilly winds, Mt Rinjani was a lot more demanding physically and mentally.

Day 2, 6.15am – After 4 hours from camp, I managed to catch the sunrise at the peak

Day 2, 6.15am – After 4 hours from camp, I managed to catch the sunrise at the peak

7.00am – The caldera rim and lake majestically illuminates as the sun rises. At the top left you’ll notice the shadow of Mt Rinjani’s peak and on the background you can also notice Mt. Agung of Bali

7.00am – The caldera rim and lake majestically illuminates as the sun rises. At the top left you’ll notice the shadow of Mt Rinjani’s peak and on the background you can also notice Mt. Agung of Bali

7.00am – Panoramic view of the eastern side

7.00am – Panoramic view of the eastern side

Another view of the eastern side

Another view of the eastern side

7.40am – Going down was much easier and took half the time because the ground was so soft you could literally slide down. I’ve lost count of how many times I fell…

7.40am – Going down was much easier and took half the time because the ground was so soft you could literally slide down. I’ve lost count of how many times I fell…

9.00am – Rinjani view of the Crater Lake; love the blue-green tone of the water

9.00am – Rinjani view of the Crater Lake; love the blue-green tone of the water

Day 2, 10.15am, upon arrival at campsite, we had to begin packing immediately for our next journey to the lake which is supposedly a 3 hour hike. Not many surprises as it was quite a mild hike. We managed to reach in 4 hours due to extra rest breaks in between. Thereafter we spent our time relaxing at the hot springs, a well-deserved rest!

2.20pm – Approaching the Crater Lake; One of the happiest moments of this trip aside from reaching the summit of Mt Rinjani, we could finally rest for the day

2.20pm – Approaching the Crater Lake; One of the happiest moments of this trip aside from reaching the summit of Mt Rinjani, we could finally rest for the day

5.00pm – Hot springs 20 minutes from campsite by the lake

5.00pm – Hot springs 20 minutes from campsite by the lake

5.30pm – Evening view of the lake and baby volcano

5.30pm – Evening view of the lake and baby volcano

Day 3, 5.00am morning call, so we were told that our total hiking time for the day was at least 8 hours long. But we’ve already been through the worst so this was like a moderate hike for our already trained muscles. We would be hiking up the Senaru crater rim (facing Senaru) before descending 6 hours to Rinjani Trek Centre at Senaru where the journey comes to an end.

Day 3, 7.45am – The famous picture of Mt Rinjani and all its splendours

Day 3, 7.45am – The famous picture of Mt Rinjani and all its splendours

9.15am – Clearer view at the crater rim

9.15am – Clearer view at the crater rim

9.45am – We began our descend on rocky surface before entering the forest, this was actually the Senaru path to Mt. Rinjani

9.45am – We began our descend on rocky surface before entering the forest, this was actually the Senaru path to Mt. Rinjani

3.25pm – We made it! What a hike and what a relief! However I didn’t realise it was another 30mins from here to our pick-up point

3.25pm – We made it! What a hike and what a relief! However I didn’t realise it was another 30mins from here to our pick-up point

There are a few tour packages ranging from 2d1n to 4d3n. Our 3d2n package was considered the most strenuous and not really recommended for casual hikers. The reason is that we weren’t supposed to camp by the lake in Day 2 but instead at the crater rim of Senaru but due to fatigue our guide advised us to rest and take a longer trip on Day 3. Hence for a more relaxing trip, take the 4d3n package. I’d also like to give credit to the guides and porters who were amazing in providing exceptional hospitality throughout our journey, kudos to them!

It was an unforgettable experience climbing Mt Rinjani. It was also a test of strength and determination and I sweat blood and tears to reach the summit. But at the end of the day, the satisfaction, feeling of triumph, and memories formed was totally worth the torture we all had to go through. Never give up!

What to bring/wear?

Temperature ranges from ~5 – 34°C so pack for tropical and temperate climates

  • Clothing: T-shirt, jacket, wind-breaker; shorts, long trek pants; cap; hiking shoes; face mask; gloves
  • Equipment: Hiking stick (really useful, rent available); head torch; raincoat; sun glasses
  • Miscellaneous: Sun lotion; wet tissues (bring a lot as there is no running water); hand sanitizer; energy bars or any high calorie food

Jo’s ratings (ratings are subjective and biased towards participants’ experience)

  1. Accessibility: 10/10 (The taxis take you directly to the entry point)
  2. Difficulty: 9/10 (The hike to the summit were both physically and mentally demanding)
  3. Rewarding Experience: 10/10 (The amount of effort you put in is worth everything, the view was breath-taking!)
  4. Overall Rating: 9/10 (Climbing Mt Rinjani is becoming more popular each year, so climb before it gets too crowded and poluted)

Additional Information

We gave a small tip to the guide and porters for their generous service. But this is entirely up to you.

Getting there

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Waterfall Trek @ Lata Medang, Kuala Kubu Bharu

Brief Information

Lata Medang is situated just beyond the town of Kuala Kubu Bharu (KKB) if you are on the way to Fraser’s Hill. To be more specific, it is just 10 to 15 minutes after the KKB dam where you will come across the Kampung Pertak signboard which is where you enter. Some attractions worth stopping by on your way to Lata Medang include ‘Kedai Makanan Lee’ in KKB town which is famous for its curry noodles, yong tau foo, and wan tan noodles. Apart from that be sure to buy some durian cake and kaya puffs from Teng Wun Bakery and Confectionery. Both can be searched online. Last but not least, don’t forget to stop by the dam to take a picture by the beautiful lake!

My Experience

If you’re looking for a short getaway coupled with a moderately easy hike and a spectacular waterfall to cool off after then this is a treat for you. The journey is only about an hour and half drive from KL to reach the parking zone. The trekking itself is another hour and half (assuming group of 5 moderately fit individuals) and the waterfall… see for yourself in the pictures below 🙂

By the way when I say moderately easy what I mean is that the paths are clear-cut and there are no real obstacles during the trek. I’d consider it a friendly hike as there were plenty of families who brought their children for the hike.

The trekking begins with two bridge crossings around 5 minutes apart between the two.

The trekking begins with two bridge crossings around 5 minutes apart between the two.

There were quite a number of campers by the river.

There were quite a number of campers by the river.

There were two or three occasions where the path was split but we just kept to the left.

The waterfall was divided into 3 levels; this was the first level where the pool is very gentle making it ideal for wading. Shortly up ahead, you’ll notice level 2 as there is a small clearing for camping. It was very disappointing to see lots of rubbish left over by irresponsible campers.

The waterfall was divided into 3 levels; this was the first level where the pool is very gentle making it ideal for wading. Shortly up ahead, you’ll notice level 2 as there is a small clearing for camping. It was very disappointing to see lots of rubbish left over by irresponsible campers.

Finally… the majestic Lata Medang Waterfall!

Finally… the majestic Lata Medang Waterfall!

Standing at an estimate of 15 to 20 meters in height, she is one powerful waterfall. The pool was quite small and you have to be careful of large boulders underwater.

Standing at an estimate of 15 to 20 meters in height, she is one powerful waterfall. The pool was quite small and you have to be careful of large boulders underwater.

Lata Medang is a spectacular waterfall. What I enjoyed most was sitting underneath the fall and getting a shoulder massage by nature (yes there is place for you to sit). Furthermore, level 3 was much cleaner which is always a bonus when it comes to my personal ratings. So overall Lata Medang is another friendly get-away location where it is safe to bring adventurous children and trekkers who are looking for a solid 1.5 hour hike.

What to bring/wear?

There were no leeches during my trip hence it is fine to wear shorts.

Jo’s ratings (ratings are subjective and biased towards participants’ experience)

  1. Accessibility: 10/10 (There were proper roads and an open space for parking)
  2. Difficulty: 4/10 (Only one or two steep sections, other than that the path was quite flat)
  3. Rewarding Experience: 7/10 (A decent hike especially after having disappeared for a while coupled with a spectacular waterfall and cleanliness is a plus point too)
  4. Overall Rating: 7/10 (A friendly place for family trips and non-seasoned hikers)

Additional Information

Be a responsible person, leave only footprints and memories behind.

Getting there

GPS Coordinates (Decimal Degrees):

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  1. From KL, use the North South highway (E1) heading towards Ipoh and turn off at Kuala Kubu Bharu
  2. Head to the town of KKB and follow highway 55 until you reach the dam
  3. Shortly after you pass the dam, turn in at Kg Pertak follow the path until you reach the parking zone

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2015 – Up And Coming Adventures

What a year 2014 has been! I admit that I haven’t been on any sort of adventures whatsoever since the Bukit Apeh hike back in May due to work and budget reasons. But 2015 will be different as I’m looking forward to overdue adventures on my bucket list as well as some pre-planned trips if they were to materialise. So here’s what to expect tentatively from footstepstonature in 2015:

  1. ATV @ Shah Alam
  2. Hiking @ Mt Rinjani, Indonesia
  3. Annual Scuba Diving Trip, somewhere in Malaysia
  4. White Water Rafting @ Sungai Selangor

Be sure to visit footstepstonature.com again in 2015! Adios!

Dear Adventurers,

Just a reminder to reduce outdoor activities In lieu of the current hazy conditions in Malaysia. Unless of course you believe in ‘YOLO’ then by all means have a great time! But in all seriousness the hazy season is back and it’s likely to last for awhile though it has been pouring lately in the afternoon.

Look at the bright side, this is the best time to increase gym time and/or indoor exercises to stay fit! Eat right and stay fit, it’s the best defense against air pollutants.

Cheers!

Hiking @ Bukit Apeh (Apeh Hill) 4/05/2014

Brief Information

Bukit Apeh literally translates into “Uncle’s Hill” in Chinese context, I’m not too sure why they named it as such but I reckon its best we leave it at that. Bukit Apeh is connected to another hill named Bukit Saga, both shares a similar peak thus the differences are their entry points and I reckon Saga is longer in distance too. Very similar to Bukit Gasing, there are many interconnected trails within the vicinity.

My Experience

I have two words to summarise Apeh Hill, ‘popular’ and ‘lunges’. For obvious reasons, this place is equally as popular as Gasing Hill judging from the amount of cars parked along the road as well as people traffic along the trails. Lunges! The only time I have ever climbed so many steps in a day was at Mount Kinabalu, but I think it’s more of the long steep stretches that caused our heart rates to scream inside our averagely fit bodies.

We began our hike from Jalan Awana 23 where the entrance was greeted by a fruit juice store. Boost your energy levels before a hike or quench your thirst after, have it your way.

We began our hike from Jalan Awana 23 where the entrance was greeted by a fruit juice store. Boost your energy levels before a hike or quench your thirst after, have it your way.

There are a total of 6 levels in Bukit Apeh but somehow we did not go through all of them to reach the peak at level 6. The initial phase of the hike to level 1 was quite the warm-up with gradual up and downhill climbs, good to get your heart rate increased. From level 1 onward it is like doing lunges all the way up with another 2 more rest stops before reaching level 6.

Initial phase of the hike made up of gradual slopes and a dog... what!

Initial phase of the hike made up of gradual slopes and a dog… what!

Level 1 – The Bridge

Level 1 – The Bridge

Level 1.1 – The Death Climb, guaranteed to unclog the pores of your skin and clear any sort of substance abuse to your body a night before.

Level 1.1 – The Death Climb, guaranteed to unclog the pores of your skin and clear any sort of substance abuse to your body a night before.

Left and Mid: Level 2 with a tent and water station. Right: Level 3 reads “Gold Station”

Left and Mid: Level 2 with a tent and water station. Right: Level 3 reads “Gold Station”

We began our hike at 10am and managed to reach level 6 in 45 minutes. Though it is considered short compared to some other hikes I’ve been, Bukit Apeh works the thigh and glutes very well. You could throw a small rave party at level 6, literally. It was quite a big area with a large canopy complete with water stations, tables, chairs, tea pots, and even a chin-up bar. For those who enjoy waterfalls, the hike is only within half an hour away.

Level 6 is where it’s at; apparently there are lots of activities happening here earlier in the morning

Level 6 is where it’s at; apparently there are lots of activities happening here earlier in the morning

Take this exit to the waterfall. After a short walk you’ll pass through level 5, keep heading straight

Take this exit to the waterfall. After a short walk you’ll pass through level 5, keep heading straight

Descending to the waterfall, when you come across an intersection turn left and you’ll be on your way

Descending to the waterfall, when you come across an intersection turn left and you’ll be on your way

Not a fantastic fall but still worth the trek, approximately 10meter sloping waterfall with a large area for picnic or camping

Not a fantastic fall but still worth the trek, approximately 10meter sloping waterfall with a large area for picnic or camping

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Crew of the day

Crew of the day

Overall Bukit Apeh offers a good few hours of hiking if you decide to detour to the waterfall. However, if you’re looking for bigger challenges try hiking from one entrance all the way to another. I realised that there are a lot of friendly hikers out there who’d greet you and even offer assistance. So put on a smile when you’re out there too.

What to bring/wear?

  • Lotion for bee sting

Jo’s ratings (ratings are subjective and biased towards participants’ experience)

  • Accessibility: 10/10

If possible park your car along the main road rather than inside the neighbourhood

  • Difficulty: 5/10

Long stretches of uphill climbing gets the heart racing but overall it’s good training for tougher hikes

  • Rewarding Experience: 5/10

Nothing very spectacular about this hike except that it is convenient and good toning for the glutes

  • Overall Rating: 5/10

Good place for a quick getaway hike, very people-friendly place with guiding ropes for steep sections of the hike. Waterfall was not much to shout about

Additional Information

Be careful of bees. Carry lotion for bee stings or even adrenaline shots to prevent allergic reactions if they do sell those here.

Getting there

GPS Coordinates (Decimal Degrees): 3.089615 101.766131

Directions are very straight forward, just search for Jalan Awana 23 with Maps or Waze.

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Top 10 Hiking Safety Tips

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As outdoor enthusiasts it is crucial that we take precautions into account when planning for a trip. Here are 10 safety tips provided by Yasmin Ahmad Kamil from The Star Online, bear in mind that it shouldn’t be limited to hiking only. Enjoy!

1. Let others know where you’re heading

Inform your family and close friends if you plan to go for a hike, giving them the start time and estimated finish time of your hike. That way, your family members can alert the relevant authorities in the event that they do not hear from you by the appointed time. (Does the movie 127 hours ring a bell?)

2. Wear the right gear

Using the right shoes makes a difference. Instead of constantly slipping on wet rocks, get a pair with a good grip. Additionally, using accessories catered to your personal needs, such as knee support or knee guards if you have knee problems, may enhance your personal safety.

3. Travel with a buddy or in groups

Sometimes, there is safety in numbers. Have a buddy system or travel in a group, ensuring that everyone looks out for each other.

4. Carry a whistle

In moments of distress, you may not be in a position to shout for help. A whistle eliminates the need to shout — three short or equal blasts is a universal signal for help. This can be repeated until two short or equal blasts of a whistle, a sign of recognition from another party, is heard.

5. Wear bright colours 

If one is lost, wearing bright colours and clothing with reflectors can improve one’s chances of being seen, especially in the dark.

6. Use a familiar route over an unfamiliar one

Though at times it may seem appealing to use an unfamiliar route when hiking, using
familiar and marked trails should take precedence over your thirst for the unknown.
An unexpected long hike could lead to insufficient water supply or the possibility of getting lost, jeopardising one’s safety.

7. Avoid bad weather 

Don’t be a hero – skip the hike in undesirable weather conditions.
Heavy rain worsens one’s visibility while those unaccustomed to extremely hot and humid weather may experience heatstroke and dehydration when hiking.

8. Bring a safety kit

From discomforts such as blisters to serious injuries such as cuts or broken bones, accidents and injuries are sometimes unavoidable in outdoor activities. Accidents may happen and having a safety kit equipped with a safety manual or having basic safety knowledge can go a long way in dealing with an injury.

9. Hiking sustenance

Depending on the duration of your hike, bring enough snacks and water to sustain you throughout your journey. Going on a long hike on an empty stomach can leave you feeling tired, not only spoiling the trip for yourself but others who are hiking with you.

10. Level of difficulty

Gauge your level of fitness and choose a trail accordingly — each trail has a different level of difficulty. Some trails will require you to pull yourself up and rock climb, while others have a flat, even ground, making it an easier trail for novices. Do not be tempted to take a difficult trail if your fitness level is not on par — this not only poses a threat to your safety but takes the fun out of hiking for you and your hiking buddies.

(Original online article can be found at http://m.thestar.com.my/story.aspx?hl=Top+10+hiking+safety+tips&sec=news&id=%7B1EA2B573-9C3E-4DC3-A096-B5DE2E5EBEB4%7D)

Waterfall Trek @ Jeram Perlus, Hulu Langat

Brief Information

Jeram Perlus waterfall is quite a fascinating scene. Not to mention its height clearly making it the tallest waterfall I’ve seen of all my limited waterfall adventures. It is situated mildly deep into the jungles of Hulu Langat as a 2.5 hours trek is demanded in order to be rewarded with such treasure. If you’re looking for a solid trek bundled with picnic and a waterfall all to yourself, Jeram Perlus is highly recommended.

My Experience

So this time around I arranged a small group of 3 first timers who were enthusiastic to include outdoor activities as part of their fitness goals this year onwards. Because we were all sportsmen, I had to search for a hike challenging enough to test our stamina in an unfamiliar terrain but not enough to wear our joints out. Hence I stumbled upon Jeram Perlus. Sharing the same entrance as the ever so popular Sg Gabai waterfall makes Jeram Perlus easy to locate… the parking lot that is.

The starting point of this hike should be in an Orang Asli (Native) village. Once you’ve parked your vehicle, follow the road until it reaches the end (you can approach the villagers as they are helpful).

Entrance of the hike, no turning back.

Entrance of the hike, no turning back.

I can’t provide accurate directions for this trip hence here’s a tip for those unfamiliar to Jeram Perlus, GET A GUIDE! It’s better to be safe than sorry when you’ve hiked for hours and end up nowhere with supplies dwindling. Remember it’s a 2.5-3 hours hike so unless you’re familiar, best to hire someone who can take you there and return safely. We hired a guide for RM70 (non-negotiable), there were two actually, one lead and the other followed behind… barefooted. His feet were considerably bigger than US size 12 (and thick too!), perhaps not binding our feet with the sorcery of branded shoes really does make our feet grow?

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I reckon there are various routes to the waterfall, having read other blogs, the route didn’t seem too consistent with the one we were on. Anyhow this route was slightly challenging in the earlier stages with long stretches of uphill and obstacles made from fallen trees. It was also comforting to know that the village children use the same path to travel to school; maybe our guide was indirectly telling us to buck up… Just my two cents.

Left: Fallen tree obstacle at the earlier stage of the trek; Right: The terrain gets tougher at the latter stage as the path takes us along the hill

Left: Fallen tree obstacle at the earlier stage of the trek; Right: The terrain gets tougher at the latter stage as the path takes us along the hill.

As this was all our first time trekking such a distance, along the way when fatigue began to set in I was constantly looking at my watch and asking the guide “how long more to reach the waterfall?” His reply was the same each time, “not so soon”. In the middle of nowhere it’s easy to lose focus and motivation if you’re not properly hydrated. Thank goodness for the amount of supplies we brought, apparently it was just enough to last the journey back.

First sight of a bigger stream, from here we knew we were nearing our destination

First sight of a bigger stream, from here we knew we were nearing our destination.

It was only after more than 2 hours that we saw plenty of water. It was indeed comforting because throughout the journey we came across more dry bamboo forest than lush greenery; there were even parts where a forest fire had occurred leaving black patches of soot on the ground.

Standing at an estimated height of 30 meters, I present Jeram Perlus Waterfall! This type of fall is sloping as you can see making its waters gentle as it flows down from top. Moreover, the volume of water pouring down is spread out thereby reducing its power and momentum. This makes it ideal for lying back against the rock where the waterfall fuses with its pool below.

Standing at an estimated height of 30 meters, I present Jeram Perlus Waterfall! This type of fall is sloping as you can see making its waters gentle as it flows down from top. Moreover, the volume of water pouring down is spread out thereby reducing its power and momentum. This makes it ideal for lying back against the rock where the waterfall fuses with its pool below.

Check out the video: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=827428177273310&set=vb.750764898272972&type=2&theater&notif_t=video_processed

Panoramic view of Jeram Perlus fall, there are 2 small wading pools and several areas for picnic close to the waterfall. Camping sites are located just beside the second pool.

Panoramic view of Jeram Perlus fall, there are 2 small wading pools and several areas for picnic close to the waterfall. Camping sites are located just beside the second pool.

That feeling of liberation when one surrenders to be overwhelmed by icy fresh water courtesy of nature’s creation.

That feeling of liberation when one surrenders to be overwhelmed by icy fresh water courtesy of nature’s creation.

Our journey back was half an hour quicker since we took fewer breaks and it also felt less intense somehow, perhaps we already had an idea of the trekking distance and familiarity with the terrain. Nevertheless my joints were sore when we finally reached civilisation.

I love the feeling of relief, kind of like having a chilled beverage after working long hours in the sun. In this case, standing before the tallest waterfall I’ve seen after the most laborious hike I’ve attempted makes Jeram Perlus an ideal destination for those seeking a good few hours of hiking followed by a relaxing time chilling or camping beside the waterfall. Another plus point was that at the time we went only one of us got caught by a leech which was eventually brushed aside.

What to bring/wear?

  • Long pants (prevent cuts from branches)
  • Mosquito repellent (although we didn’t have issues with mosquitoes)
  • Salt (win the fight against leeches)

Jo’s ratings (ratings are subjective and biased towards participants’ experience)

  • Accessibility: 8/10

There was a single narrow road leading all the way to the parking spot at the village.

  • Difficulty: 7/10

This was definitely the most challenging hike I’ve done in terms of testing my endurance, there were several long stretches of uphill climb which will burn your thigh muscles and the level of humidity will drain the water from your body.

  • Rewarding Experience: 8/10

Everyone sighed with relief of reaching as well as sighting such a waterfall; this was also my most memorable moment of the whole trek.

  • Overall Rating: 8/10

I’d rate this waterfall trek highly due to its exclusivity and location. It’s not far from the city centre and I’m not a big fan of very crowded waterfalls. The fact that you’d have to trek a couple of km was also contributed to my rating.

Additional Information

Be sure to get a guide on your first time or if you’re not too confident with the directions.

Getting there

GPS Coordinates (Decimal Degrees): 3.167587 101.900236

  1. From Cheras-Kajang Highway, turn off at Jalan Hulu Langat (B52) and continue straight all the way
  2. You’d notice signboards along the way for Sg Gabai waterfall, follow them anyway as both entrances are the same
  3. Take a right turn at Jalan Sungai Lui (B19), after a short distance the signboard will inform you to make a left turn to enter a small road
  4. You’d come across a divide, keep left and you should be on your way to the village
  1. From Jalan Ampang, turn right to Jalan Taman Putra, subsequently take a left turn to Jalan Hulu Langat (B62)
  2. Follow the road all the way until the intersection to join Jalan Hulu Langat (B52) where you’ll make a left turn
  3. You’d notice signboards along the way for Sg Gabai waterfall, follow them anyway as both entrances are the same
  4. Take a right turn at Jalan Sungai Lui (B19), after a short distance the signboard will inform you to make a left turn to enter a small road
  5. You’d come across a divide, keep left and you should be on your way to the village
Park your car at a platform next to the mosque and beware of dog poop!

Park your car at a platform next to the mosque and beware of dog poop!